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Nobody’s Listening. No.75. 22.5.17.

Nobody’s Listening Facebook Page.

Hullo. Firstly, apologies for the interrupted service last week. I was in deepest darkest Wolverhampton attending a course for work which required my undivided attention. As it happens, I failed it spectacularly. So much for study eh?
Anyways, school’s for fools so here I am, back again with ten more tunes to delight, confuse, entertain and inform.

Naturally, Paulo is back with us. This week, my very good friend, bandmate and former costume designer for the Alfreton Gilbert and Sullivan society has chosen some modern day psych that fits into this weeks offerings nicely and also bangs like a bastard.

Okie dokie then, this is the time, time for action..

Track 1. TThhEe PPaARRtTYY by Justice ft Uffie.

We begin in Part-eh mode for the first few tracks, kicking off with a tune which frequently pops up on BBC 6 music. It’s always a pleasure when I unexpectedly hear the opening bars of this 2009 track from former NL alumni Justice. Guest vocalist Uffie’s lyric makes one pine for those weekends when all that mattered was having a good time, all of the time. Ah, sweet bird of youth…

Track 2. Octavius by The Bongolian.

Continuing our feel good factor, we have Nasser Bouzida a.k.a. “The Bongolian”. This comes from his sixth album ‘Moog Maximus’ which was released last summer and is a hammond infused dancer with his trademark, groove heavy fusion of Funk, Soul, B-Boy Breaks, Jazz and Sci-Fi Boogaloo. Keep yer plates of meat still during this one, I dares ya.

Track 3. The Past Tense by Infinite Bisous.

I’m currently devouring David Stubbs’ excellent 2014 book ‘Future Days- Krautrock And The Building Of Modern Germany’ which is an almost exhaustive deconstruction of the genre. This has prompted me to go back and listen to the bands that shaped one of the most enduring movements of the twentieth century. We’ll get to our cover stars later, in the meantime, the next couple of tracks are further proof of how those acts continue to inspire and influence current artists forty years after their peak. Here we have Paris based Londoner Rory McCarthy who trades as Infinite Bisous and a cut from his LP released earlier this year ‘w/ love’. It’s obvious from the very beginning that Kraftwerk are prominent in his record collection, the steady synths that open this tune add a distinct Hütter/Schneider feel to it.

Track 4. Trust You by Neils Children.

****PAULO’S PICK OF THE WEEK****

Paulo’s pick this week also shows the hands of Modern German Music are far reaching although this cut from their 2013 LP ‘Dimly Lit’ errs more on the psych side of Krautrock than the clinical motorik of Neu! et al. It has the repetitive nuances of our next pick as well as taking in British late sixties psych such as early Floyd. Dreamy, summery, reverb drenched goodness, it’s an overlooked gem. Another cracking selection from the Wortley wonder!

Track 5. Burning Sister by Amon Düül II.

And so, to our cover stars and the subject of the first chapter of the aforementioned book. I must admit, I’ve only took a passing interest in this band, hearing the odd track on Stuart Maconie’s Freakzone, which has been essential Sunday evening listening for the past ten years or so. After reading Stubbs’ tome however, I’ve submerged myself in their back catalogue and become quite obsessed with this seminal band. This track comes from their 1970 sophomore release ‘Yeti’ and is an accessible entry point for anyone who would like to begin a rewarding journey into the world of one of the progenitors of “kosmische Musik”.

Track 6. Call The Days by Nadia Reid.

Ok, we’ll leave behind our brothers and sisters from Deutschland for this week, and take an eleven and a half thousand mile trip to New Zealand. Like her Kiwi compatriot Hollie Fulbrook AKA Tiny Ruins, Nadia Reid is an Auckland native who uses her gentle acoustic guitar and soft, folky voice to convey bittersweet songs of love, loss and longing. Here she is with such a cut from her 2015 debut LP ‘Listen To Formation, Look For The Signs’.

Track 7. Nobody But Me by The Human Beinz.

Our next pick was a 1968 one hit wonder for soul infused garage rock band The Human Beinz. Released on some versions of Lenny Kaye’s legendary ‘Nuggets’ compilation, it is a reworking of the Isley Brothers song from 1962 in that it takes the closing refrain and extends it to a full length song. It had another lease of life a few years back when Quentin Tarantino used it in his film Kill Bill: Vol. 1, although it did not appear on the movie soundtrack. Now a standard on the Mod scene, it can get the coolest of faces dance-floor bound with its joyful and infectious beats.

Track 8. Estevez by Javelin.

This 2011 track from Brooklyn based production duo Javelin comes from the ‘Canyon Candy’ EP released on that years record store day which had a concept celebrating the old west. A pedal steel sampling modern day cowboy soundtrack it has an accompanying short film which was released shortly after which you can view here should you wish.

Track 9. Don’t Huzzle For Love by Apostles.

We reached a balmy 25 degrees here in that London this week which naturally made me reach for some Afro-beat. Here is Nigeria’s The Apostles with the organ heavy funker that opened their 1974 LP ‘Black Is Beautiful’. A perfect soundtrack to pound the hot city pavement to, here’s hoping that there are many more such days this summer. As I type, it’s currently pissing down and has been all day. Still, tracks like this can bring the soleil whatever the weather.

Track 10. Try A Little Tenderness by Otis Redding.

For our wedding anniversary last week, the current Mrs Orley and I paid a visit to the Bradford Alhambra to see Roddy Doyle’s musical based on his book and the film ‘The Commitments’. As you probably know, this song features prominently and the assembled troupe made a decent fist of it all things told. However, nobody can touch The King Of Soul’s version. Backed by Booker T and The Mg’s and arranged by Isaac Hayes, this stone cold Stax classic may be a bit of an obvious choice for the soul slowie closer slot, but sometimes things are so obvious you forget just how special they are. Drink this in and fall in love with it all over again.

There You go then. It’s good to be back. Hope you didn’t miss us too much last week, but everyone needs a breather now and again, don’t they?.

Let’s make a date for the same time and place next Friday, yeah?

Until then, I’ll Keep You Satisfied.

Andrew Orley.

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